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Regulating sex for saleProstitution policy reform in the UK$
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Jo Phoenix

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847421067

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847421067.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

What's anti-social about sex work? Governance through the changing representation of prostitution's incivility

What's anti-social about sex work? Governance through the changing representation of prostitution's incivility

Chapter:
(p.29) Two What's anti-social about sex work? Governance through the changing representation of prostitution's incivility
Source:
Regulating sex for sale
Author(s):

Jane Scoular

Jane Pitcher

Rosie Campbell

Phil Hubbard

Maggie O'Neill

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847421067.003.0002

This chapter utilizes both critical and empirical forms of enquiry to uncover the relationship between dominant constructions of the ‘problem of prostitution’ and the associated norms that operate across various historical epochs, focusing in particular on the recent association between street sex work and anti-social behaviour. It shows that the alleged antithesis of sex work to community safety owes as much to the ideological operation of the law as to any inherent feature of commercial sex. The chapter considers the practical implications of recent reforms, which continue to follow this ideology. It outlines some of the dangers of policy frameworks and techniques of control that continue to situate sex work as antithetical to the cultivation of community safety, by reflecting on a recent Joseph Rowntree Foundation-funded study, which examined the experiences of those living and working in areas of street sex work.

Keywords:   forms of enquiry, problem of prostitution, historical epochs, street sex work, anti-social behaviour, sex work, commercial sex, reforms, Joseph Rowntree Foundation

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