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Policy for a changeLocal labour market analysis and gender equality$
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Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420541

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420541.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Segregation and clustering in the labour market: men, women and local-level analysis

Segregation and clustering in the labour market: men, women and local-level analysis

Chapter:
(p.59) Four Segregation and clustering in the labour market: men, women and local-level analysis
Source:
Policy for a change
Author(s):

Lisa Buckner

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420541.003.0004

This chapter addresses what local-level analysis reveals about segregation and clustering in the labour market among women. It also extends the argument for analysing disaggregated data to include other characteristics that may affect men's and women's labour-market engagement, such as age, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and disability. The chapter then argues that the geographical clustering of similar groups of people, such as students, men, and women from particular ethnic-minority groups, and people who are outside or disconnected from the labour market, is also of critical importance. It is important to note that analysing labour-market indicators at the local level shows that not all labour markets work equally well for all people. Using local data to analyse labour-market engagement also illustrates the geographical clustering of people from some ethnic groups and of men and women in particular economic situations.

Keywords:   labour market, segregation, geographical clustering, women, men, age, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, disability

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