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City survivorsBringing up children in disadvantaged neighbourhoods$
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Anne Power

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420503

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420503.001.0001

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date: 21 August 2017

City survival within precarious communities – who pays the price of change?

City survival within precarious communities – who pays the price of change?

Chapter:
(p.147) Seven City survival within precarious communities – who pays the price of change?
Source:
City survivors
Author(s):

Anne Power

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420503.003.0007

This chapter explores the gap between what families need and how city structures support their inhabitants. It notes that in theory at least, city governments try to equalise conditions on the grounds of fairness and cohesion. It observes that low-income families in return provide many essential services to the city, as restaurant workers, drivers, school assistants, IT and childcare workers, cleaners, security assistants, and carers of every kind, all vital functions within the city. It explains that the four families in this chapter argue the overriding case for community-level involvement to shape interventions more closely to family survival. It further explains that external interventions are often insensitive to community networks and the informal supports they provide, whereas community-level activity values the normally uncounted benefits of families in city neighbourhoods.

Keywords:   families, city governments, cohesion, low-income families, community-level involvement, external interventions

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