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Devolution and social citizenship in the UK$
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Scott L. Greer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420367

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420367.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

Un-joined-up government: intergovernmental relations and citizenship rights1

Un-joined-up government: intergovernmental relations and citizenship rights1

Chapter:
(p.117) Seven Un-joined-up government: intergovernmental relations and citizenship rights1
Source:
Devolution and social citizenship in the UK
Author(s):

Alan Trench

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420367.003.0007

This chapter on intergovernmental relations makes the case that an area often thought of as a lawyers' hobby rather than a major political variable is indeed key to the development of social citizenship on the practical and the rhetorical levels. Practically, governments cannot develop distinctive social citizenship if it requires policies they cannot make. Theoretically, debates about social policy channel and change social citizenship thinking and models of social citizenship. Governments themselves are major participants in the debates through which understandings of citizenship evolve, and the forums they meet in, the kinds of issues they debate, and the extent to which they shape each other's policies matter. The influence is reciprocal; citizenship, or concepts of fairness, provide much of the fuel for the fires that are increasingly whipped up around financial formulae or representation.

Keywords:   social citizenship, social policy, citizenship rights, intergovernmental relations

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