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Community cohesion in crisis?New dimensions of diversity and difference$
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John Flint and David Robinson

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781847420244

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781847420244.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Too much cohesion? Young people's territoriality in Glasgow and Edinburgh

Too much cohesion? Young people's territoriality in Glasgow and Edinburgh

Chapter:
(p.199) ten Too much cohesion? Young people's territoriality in Glasgow and Edinburgh
Source:
Community cohesion in crisis?
Author(s):

Keith Kintrea

Naofumi Suzuki

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781847420244.003.0011

This chapter looks at territoriality among young people in Edinburgh and Glasgow. It sheds some light on how the socio-spatial manifestations of division are neither new nor limited to inter-ethnic or religious rivalries. The authors illustrate how territoriality plays out in different ways, depending on the local neighbourhood histories and dynamics, and the age and gender of the affected groups. The chapter also identifies some of the negative consequences of territoriality for young people, which include constraints on mobility and social interaction, and limited access to neighbourhood facilities and educational institutions. This discussion also presents a finding that territoriality represents a type of belonging and attachment to a neighbourhood which signifies a form of cohesion that may be potentially reshaped towards more positive outcomes.

Keywords:   territoriality, socio-spatial manifestations, negative consequences, belonging, neighbourhood

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