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Nannies, Migration and Early Childhood Education and CareAn International Comparison of In-Home Childcare Policy and Practice$
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Elizabeth Adamson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447330141

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447330141.001.0001

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date: 23 August 2017

Intersecting inequalities

Intersecting inequalities

Chapter:
(p.117) Five Intersecting inequalities
Source:
Nannies, Migration and Early Childhood Education and Care
Author(s):

Elizabeth Adamson

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447330141.003.0006

This chapter builds on Chapter 4 by analysing the intersection between childcare and migration policy. It illustrates how emphasis on a single policy area has implications for intersecting issues of gender, income/class and race/migration. These intersecting issues of gender, income/class and race/migration are experienced by families (mothers, parents and children) and by care workers. The analysis examines how policies addressing inequalities experienced by one social group can, in practice, have negative implications for other social groups involved. For example, policies designed to increase mothers’ workforce participation to address gender equality in the workplace often overshadow the working conditions and inequities experienced by women performing the care work. This issue is exacerbated for in-home childcare, as workers are often subject to few regulations and their work is largely invisible, in the private and informal domain.

Keywords:   inequalities, gender, race, migration, care workers

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