Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Creative Citizen UnboundHow Social Media and DIY Culture Contribute to Democracy, Communities and the Creative Economy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ian Hargreaves and John Hartley

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447324942

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447324942.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 22 August 2017

A problem of knowledge – solved?

A problem of knowledge – solved?

Chapter:
(p.25) Two A problem of knowledge – solved?
Source:
The Creative Citizen Unbound
Author(s):

John Hartley

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447324942.003.0002

A wide literature review establishes a conceptual framework for the idea of creative citizenship. It identifies methodological individualism as a generic problem standing in its way, arguing that the place of citizenship in society and its connections with creativity needs a radical overhaul. Having summarised three social science approaches to the concept of citizenship, we propose a fourth, namely: a creative, cultural or DIY approach, made feasible by ubiquitous social media in a market environment. This approach arises from humanities thinking, rather than from social science and embraces the tensions between citizenship as a source of obligations and as a resource of playfulness. Creative citizenship reconciles these: ‘brought together in one knowledge system though they remain apart from one another in scholarly traditions.’ Creative citizenship’s dynamics are evolutionary and complex rather than subject to the linear momentum of classical economics. Creative citizenship’s habitat is best understood as one of complex systems, interacting and shifting in relationship to one another at a planetary scale. In this complexity, everyone, everywhere, across everything is a participant in the overall productivity of the system.

Keywords:   individualism, knowledge system, evolutionary, productivity

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .