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Moving on from Crime and Substance UseTransforming Identities$
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Anne Robinson and Paula Hamilton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447324676

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447324676.001.0001

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date: 23 August 2017

Social identity, social networks and social capital in desistance and recovery

Social identity, social networks and social capital in desistance and recovery

Chapter:
(p.175) Eight Social identity, social networks and social capital in desistance and recovery
Source:
Moving on from Crime and Substance Use
Author(s):

David Best

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447324676.003.0009

This chapter applies a Social Identity Model of Recovery (Best et al, 2015) from substance use recovery to desistance. Based on social identity theory, this approach suggests that diverse social networks, specifically those involving individuals who are non-users and/or offenders, are supportive of recovery. Such networks assist the individual in the transition ‘from addict identity to recovery identity’ and building ‘recovery capital’ created by an amalgam of personal, social and community capital, that is held together by the emerging social identities. Support for this model is provided by a mixed methods study that collected data from a sample of drug and alcohol workers in recovery from previous problematic dependent use. The chapter presents quantitative analysis and powerful case studies to argue for the role of social group membership in creating and consolidating attachments to new norms, values and behaviours, and the social identities that follow.

Keywords:   recovery, social identity, social networks, social group, substance abuse, desistance

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