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Morality and public policy$
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Clem Henricson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447323815

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447323815.001.0001

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date: 17 August 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.113) Six Conclusion
Source:
Morality and public policy
Author(s):

Clem Henricson

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447323815.003.0006

The Conclusion examines the logicality of the thesis from the discussion of the esoteric ravages of religious conflict, the belief and disbelief friction and an increasing biological interpretation of moral dispositions – through to the discussion of the efficacy of parliamentary committees, commissions, think tanks and academia. Consideration is given to how the argument has traversed a minefield of commitment and critique of metaphysical and philosophical interpretation – elements of commonality and relativism and the morality of divergent human impulses ranging from the violent to the caring. And yet, for all the scale of the subject matter, it ils noted that there is a distinct and carefully plotted train of thought the destination of which is identified in the rationale for the book, namely rectifying a deficient relationship between morality and public policy. Exploring that deficiency has involved a reappraisal of the nature of morality – a change of paradigm reflecting understandings and perceptions as they have emerged in the 21st- century and consideration of what that necessitates. The chapter closes with outstanding questions and issues for debate.

Keywords:   metaphysical, philosophical, commonality, relativism, human impulses, morality, public policy, deficit relationship, paradigm

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