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Philosophical Criminology$
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Andrew Millie

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447323709

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447323709.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.111) Eight Conclusions
Source:
Philosophical Criminology
Author(s):

Andrew Millie

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447323709.003.0008

In this chapter the place of a philosophical criminology is considered. Criminology is an inter-disciplinary enterprise and, as such, it makes sense for criminologists to engage with other disciplines such as philosophy that have for centuries attempted to answer questions of importance to criminology. By engaging with philosophy, this book has demonstrated that textbook histories of criminological thought only present a partial picture of ideas central to criminological understanding. This concluding chapter reflects on the previous seven chapters and assesses the usefulness of a philosophical approach to criminology. There is particular emphasis on Kantian philosophy, especially regarding human dignity. Relatedly, the book has drawn on ideas concerning the Golden Rule and Paul Ricoeur’s (1990) work on Christian theology and an ‘economy of gift.’ Building on the common theme of dignity, respect and the economy of gift, the previous chapters consider the possibility of an empathetic criminology. This chapter concludes by reflecting on these chapter individually and on the merits of a philosophical criminology.

Keywords:   criminology, philosophy, Kantian philosophy, human dignity, economy of gift, respect

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