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Disability and the Welfare State in BritainChanges in Perception and Policy 1948-79$
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Jameel Hampton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447316428

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447316428.001.0001

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date: 13 December 2017

The last waltz: epilogue

The last waltz: epilogue

Chapter:
(p.231) Seven The last waltz: epilogue
Source:
Disability and the Welfare State in Britain
Author(s):

Jameel Hampton

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447316428.003.0007

The epilogue examines how disabled people and groups dealt with the failures of the Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act, as well as the cash benefits discussed in chapter five. The welfare rights emphasis of the later 1970s questioned the idea of disabled people’s right to statutory provision as that of citizenship. Welfare for disabled people began to be viewed as a human right and disabled people began to self-identify as a minority group seeking more inclusion. The Union of Physically Impaired People Against Segregation, the precursor to the Disabled People’s Movement, focused on the attainment of independent living and exploring the social model of disability, partly through the idea that poverty was the manifestation, not the cause, of a greater discrimination against disabled people. Groups of disabled people became more unified and powerful with the formation of the British Council of Organisations of Disabled People in 1981.

Keywords:   The Union of Physically Impaired People Against Segregation The Disabled People’s Movement, British Council of Organisations of Disabled People, Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act, cash benefits

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