Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The success paradoxWhy we need a holistic theory of social mobility$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Graeme Atherton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781447316336

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447316336.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 21 August 2017

Unbundling, diversification and the ecological university: new models for higher education

Unbundling, diversification and the ecological university: new models for higher education

Chapter:
(p.85) Five Unbundling, diversification and the ecological university: new models for higher education
Source:
The success paradox
Author(s):

Graeme Atherton

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447316336.003.0005

This chapter will look at the relationship between higher education (HE) and social mobility. It will explore whether HE as it is presently constructed can provide all students with the skills they need to progress in work or life. It asks whether HE should move from becoming something that 40%­50% of the population participate in to something that 90% of the population should participate in? The chapter examines the arguments surrounding the benefits of higher education both economic and non­economic. It argues that the latter are in need of empirical and theoretical development. It then goes onto argue that the model of what HE can and should be in the 21st century is in need of transformation to capture the unique contribution that HE can make to the individual and collective good. In conclusion it argues for the diversification of HE both in terms of who participates in HE and the benefits that HE can provide, if HE is to be the driver of holistic social mobility.

Keywords:   higher education, social mobility, theoretical development, empirical development

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .