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Madness, distress and the politics of disablement$
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Helen Spandler, Helen Spandler, Jill Anderson, and Bob Sapey

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447314578

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447314578.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Linking ‘race’, mental health and a social model of disability: what are the possibilities?

Linking ‘race’, mental health and a social model of disability: what are the possibilities?

Chapter:
(p.127) Nine Linking ‘race’, mental health and a social model of disability: what are the possibilities?
Source:
Madness, distress and the politics of disablement
Author(s):

Frank Keating

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447314578.003.0010

This chapter uses the lens of ‘intersectionality’ and critical race theory to explore the links, connections and incongruences between mental health, disability and ethnicity/’race’. The needs and experiences of people from Black and Minority Ethnic Minority groups have largely been ignored within both the disability and mental health service user and survivor movements. This, along with the limitations of a single framework, can be addressed through bringing insights from the social model of disability into dialogue with Critical Race theory, specifically ideas around intersectionality, embodiment and ‘othering’. This chapter challenges activists and academics to engage with these ideas, with a view to identifying practical strategies for addressing the needs of people from Black and Minority Ethnic Communities who experience disability and/or distress.

Keywords:   mental health, disability, ethnicity, race, black and minority ethnic groups, activism, critical race theory, intersectionality, embodiment, othering

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