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Social Protection After the CrisisRegulation without enforcement$
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Steve Tombs

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447313755

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447313755.001.0001

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date: 17 August 2017

Re-regulation in action: ‘Better Regulation’

Re-regulation in action: ‘Better Regulation’

Chapter:
(p.107) Five Re-regulation in action: ‘Better Regulation’
Source:
Social Protection After the Crisis
Author(s):

Steve Tombs

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447313755.003.0005

The chapter traces mechanisms through which the Labour Governments from 1997, then, from 2010, the Coalition Government, sought to embed a new regulatory agenda under the auspices of ‘Better Regulation’. What is described as a feverish and relentless programme of re-regulation consists of four central mechanisms: a long term rhetorical assault on regulation as burdensome, red tape and so on; the establishment of a plethora of institutions within and of Government; various legal reform initiatives which have delivered both de-regulation and re-regulation; and a constant stream of reviews of specific regulatory agencies and of the practice and purpose of regulation in general. Better Regulation is a concerted effort at re-regulation, an attempt to re-configure the relationships between state and private capital. Moreover, while the claimed effect is that capital is being set ‘free’, these processes in fact engender a deeper and more intense inter-dependence between state and capital.

Keywords:   better regulation, hampton, legal reform, local enforcement, regulatory agencies, re regulation, rhetoric

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