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Social Protection After the CrisisRegulation without enforcement$
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Steve Tombs

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447313755

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447313755.001.0001

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date: 19 August 2017

Framing the crisis: moral critique and the renewal of ‘business as usual’

Framing the crisis: moral critique and the renewal of ‘business as usual’

Chapter:
(p.51) Three Framing the crisis: moral critique and the renewal of ‘business as usual’
Source:
Social Protection After the Crisis
Author(s):

Steve Tombs

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447313755.003.0003

The chapter focuses on some of the ‘post crisis’ dynamics in the UK, most notably the various ways in which the crisis was framed – and the moral aspects and consequences of such framings. Here the focus is upon various discursive initiatives and narratives which were constructed and utilised as, and since, the crisis unfolded. These forms of framing – each, in their own way, morality plays which cohere and compete - lay claim both to understanding the crisis, and, concomitantly, to offer lessons or prescriptions as to how, to what extent or even whether any recurrence could be prevented or mitigated. Notably absent from the prescriptions that might emerge from such morality tales is any turn to more interventionist and effective forms of regulation: the state, remarkably present as the crisis unfolded, is notably absent from post-crisis discourses, at least as part of any ‘solution’.

Keywords:   debt, blame and blaming, discourses, morality plays, frames and framing

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