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Retiring to SpainWomen's narratives of nostalgia, belonging and community$
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Anya Ahmed

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447313304

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447313304.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

Boundary spanning and reconstitution

Boundary spanning and reconstitution

retirement migration and the search for community

Chapter:
(p.51) Four Boundary spanning and reconstitution
Source:
Retiring to Spain
Author(s):

Anya Ahmed

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447313304.003.0004

This chapter suggests that thinking with community and how - and to what -people construct belonging illuminates processes of social change and continuity from particular social locations or positions. Retirement migration is presented as a form and consequence of social change, involving both boundary spanning and reconstitution. Community is thought to have been lost but is recoverable, and the role of the imagination and the imagery of the idyll are important in constructing it. The important role of nostalgia as a cultural resource in constructing belonging to different forms of community, evoking an imagined lost place or time, particularly for older people is also considered. The chapter suggests that focusing on different forms of belonging - to place, networks and identity or positionality - is useful to understand boundary spanning and reconstitution in the context of retirement migration.

Keywords:   community, social change, social continuity, nostalgia, place, networks, identity, positionality

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