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Retiring to SpainWomen's narratives of nostalgia, belonging and community$
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Anya Ahmed

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781447313304

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447313304.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

Retiring to the Costas

Retiring to the Costas

British women’s narratives of nostalgia, belonging and community

Chapter:
(p.1) One Retiring to the Costas
Source:
Retiring to Spain
Author(s):

Anya Ahmed

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447313304.003.0001

This chapter outlines the rationale and scope of the study, highlighting the invisibility of older women, - and in particular working-class women - in migration research. This chapter explains the phenomenon of retirement migration has gathered momentum over the last few decades and introduce the women upon whose lives the book is based. My approach to knowing community and belonging is explicated: this chapter premises that truth is multiple and subjective and ultimately an interpretation. The centrality of nostalgia to my analysis is highlighted: nostalgia links time and space in women’s narrative accounts of community and belonging in migration. This chapter explains that drawing on Ricouer’s (1984) work on time and narrative and Bakhtin’s (1981) use of the chronotope in literature this chapter aims to persuade the reader that nostalgia can be understood as a form of chronotope since it links a lost place and also a lost (past) time.

Keywords:   working class women, retirement migration, community, belonging, narrative analysis, interpretivism, nostalgia, chronotope

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