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Social Policy Review 25Analysis and debate in social policy, 2013$
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Gaby Ramia, Kevin Farnsworth, and Zoe Irving

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447312741

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447312741.001.0001

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date: 22 August 2017

Corporations as political actors: new perspectives for health policy research

Corporations as political actors: new perspectives for health policy research

Chapter:
(p.113) Six Corporations as political actors: new perspectives for health policy research
Source:
Social Policy Review 25
Author(s):

Ben Hawkins

Anne Roemer-mahler

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447312741.003.0006

In this chapter, Ben Hawkins and Anne Roemer-Mahler argue that it is important not only to consider the impact of business activities on health, but also to foster a deeper and more considered approach to the question of how business interests influence the shape of public health policies and strategies. They argue that the concept of interconnectedness can advance insights into corporate political power and corporate political strategy by utilising literature drawn from political science and management studies. They illustrate that, for their chosen case studies – the alcohol and pharmaceutical industries – four dimensions of interconnectedness are of particular relevance: interconnectedness between markets, industries, levels of governance and branches of government.

Keywords:   Health, Policies and strategies, Interconnectedness, Political strategy, Management, Alcohol, Pharmaceutical, Markets, Industries, Governance

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