Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Exploring the dynamics of personal, professional and interprofessional ethics$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Divya Jindal-Snape and Elizabeth F.S. Hannah

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447308997

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447308997.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 23 August 2017

Personal, professional and interprofessional ethical issues in the context of supporting children affected by bereavement

Personal, professional and interprofessional ethical issues in the context of supporting children affected by bereavement

Chapter:
(p.199) Thirteen Personal, professional and interprofessional ethical issues in the context of supporting children affected by bereavement
Source:
Exploring the dynamics of personal, professional and interprofessional ethics
Author(s):

Steve Sweeney

Per Boge

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447308997.003.0013

When a child is affected by bereavement, which may be considered stigmatising such as in the case of murder, suicide or alcohol/drugs related deaths, professionals can have a very different view about what information should be disclosed to the child. Recent research, in which data were collected from school staff, health care professionals, social workers, community learning development practitioners and police found that 47% of professionals agreed/strongly agreed it was okay for parents to withhold information from their children in such a context, with only 28% disagreeing/strongly disagreeing, 19% saying they did not know and 7% trying to qualify their responses. In recognising the tension between personal, professional and interprofessional ethics, this chapter will provide case studies from Scotland and Denmark to discuss the dilemma between the rights and needs of the child, and the adult belief system and perceived need to protect the child by withholding information based on their personal values and life experiences. The chapter will also discuss ways in which adults can model healthy grieving which builds upon the child's resilience as well as fulfilling the child's need to construct a narrative around their loss. For this to happen, it is argued, we need to be more able to work well with others who may have different personal and professional ethics and values.

Keywords:   children and bereavement, trauma, children's rights, grief support, information, truth

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .