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Exploring the dynamics of personal, professional and interprofessional ethics$
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Divya Jindal-Snape and Elizabeth F.S. Hannah

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447308997

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447308997.001.0001

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date: 17 August 2017

Personal, professional and interprofessional ethics in policing in a child protection context

Personal, professional and interprofessional ethics in policing in a child protection context

Chapter:
(p.183) Twelve Personal, professional and interprofessional ethics in policing in a child protection context
Source:
Exploring the dynamics of personal, professional and interprofessional ethics
Author(s):

Dawn MacEachern

Edward Miles

Divya Jindal-Snape

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447308997.003.0012

Police officers deal with situations which can cause ethical tensions and inner conflicts. These tensions are particularly evident for detective officers investigating child protection, domestic abuse and serious sexual assaults cases. The scales of justice are often considered to be weighing heavily towards the human rights of the suspect/accused, as the ramifications of Cadder V HMA are realised and implemented into Scots law. These tensions can exist as a result of the police performing dual roles of obtaining evidence from the victims and witnesses of crime, while interviewing suspects/ accused, finely balancing the human rights of all involved. Further inner conflicts are evident when the police are working in an increasingly interprofessional context with professionals from the social work, law and universal services of health and education. The ethical tensions in respect of the rights of the victims and accused within a legislative, personal and interprofessional context will be discussed.

Keywords:   ethics of policing, interprofessional ethical tensions, child protection, human rights

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