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Mental health service users in researchCritical sociological perspectives$
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Patsy Staddon

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447307334

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447307334.001.0001

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date: 18 August 2017

How does who we are shape the knowledge we produce? Doing collaborative research about personality disorders

How does who we are shape the knowledge we produce? Doing collaborative research about personality disorders

Chapter:
(p.53) Five How does who we are shape the knowledge we produce? Doing collaborative research about personality disorders
Source:
Mental health service users in research
Author(s):

Steve Gillard

Kati Turner

Marion Neffgen

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447307334.003.0005

This chapter describes a project about personality disorders and recovery where ‘service user involvement’ in research is seen actively to shape the research evidence base. ‘Coproduction’ of scientific knowledge critically explores not just the ‘lay’ contribution to science but also how the established academic or university knowledge base itself shapes new knowledge produced through research. The research team comprised a service user researcher, a clinical researcher and a university researcher. Interviews were conducted jointly, and interview data was analysed by the whole team. The extent to which team members’ personal and professional backgrounds impacted on the analysis process was examined from documentary records and reflective diaries. It was concluded that it is not just ‘who we are’ that shapes the production of knowledge. A moral, discursive practice enacted within the collaborative team enabled new understandings of the lived experience of personality disorders and is of applied relevance to medical practitioners.

Keywords:   discursive practice, co-production, personality disorders

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