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Combining paid work and family carePolicies and experiences in international perspective$
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Teppo Kroger and Sue Yeandle

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306818

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.001.0001

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date: 17 August 2017

Partner-care in the East Asian system: combining paid work and caring in Japan and Taiwan

Partner-care in the East Asian system: combining paid work and caring in Japan and Taiwan

Chapter:
(p.201) Eleven Partner-care in the East Asian system: combining paid work and caring in Japan and Taiwan
Source:
Combining paid work and family care
Author(s):

Mei-Chun Liu

Machiko Osawa

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306818.003.0011

Although the crisis of care has commanded a high policy profile in Japan and Taiwan, caring for a spouse or partner in either country has yet to receive serious academic or policy attention. In both countries the welfare system is family-based, with public provision of care services and subsidies available only via strict means-testing. This makes it hard for those in paid employment to meet the needs of a disabled spouse, and in the context of traditional gender norms and cultural practices, the needs, struggles and challenges of partner care remain little understood. Case material from Japan shows workers often take early retirement or cut their working hours to accommodate their newly emerging caring roles, while data from Taiwan suggests that flexibility within the job can help reconcile the dual roles of work and caring.

Keywords:   Partner-carers, Spousal care, Reconciliation, Work life balance, Family-based welfare, Job flexibility, Gender asymmetry, Japan, Taiwan

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