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Analysing social policy concepts and languageComparative and Transnational Perspectives$
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Daniel Béland and Klaus Petersen

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306443

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306443.001.0001

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date: 20 August 2017

The OECD’s search for a new social policy language

The OECD’s search for a new social policy language

from welfare state to active society

Chapter:
(p.81) FOUR The OECD’s search for a new social policy language
Source:
Analysing social policy concepts and language
Author(s):

Rianne Mahon

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306443.003.0005

This chapter examines the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) contribution to the construction of a transnational social policy language. It traces the changes in the OECD’s social policy discourse from the formation of the Directorate for Manpower Social Affairs and Education in 1974?the high point of “Keynes plus” ideas through the period of “welfare state in crisis,” launched at its 1980 conference?through to the (re-)discovery of a positive, or “social investment,” role for social policy in the 1990s and into the new millennium. The chapter concludes with an assessment of its current position as it extends the geographical reach of its analysis to include the “emerging” countries and tries to come to grips with social policy after the “financial meltdown.”

Keywords:   Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), social policy discourse, social investment, transnational social policy language, Directorate for Manpower Social Affairs and Education

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