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Policy analysis in Germany$
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Sonja Blum and Klaus Schubert

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781447306252

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.1332/policypress/9781447306252.001.0001

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date: 17 August 2017

Policy analysis in the German-speaking countries: common traditions, different cultures, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Policy analysis in the German-speaking countries: common traditions, different cultures, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

Chapter:
(p.75) Six Policy analysis in the German-speaking countries: common traditions, different cultures, in Germany, Austria and Switzerland
Source:
Policy analysis in Germany
Author(s):

Nils C. Bandelow

Fritz Sager

Peter Biegelbauer

Publisher:
Policy Press
DOI:10.1332/policypress/9781447306252.003.0006

This chapter takes a comparative perspective of policy analysis in the German-speaking countries Germany, Austria and Switzerland. Policy analysis there does not only share common scientific and political traditions but there are also established common journals (e.g. German Policy Studies), regular joint conferences, and an extensive exchange of researchers. The language contributes to a common tradition and to the use of similar analytical frameworks and methods in the three countries. Quite often, the German-speaking countries only slowly adapt to Anglo-American theoretical lenses. German-speaking policy analysis has established some own variations of theoretical frameworks (like the Actor-centered Institutionalism). Nonetheless, each of the three countries has established substantial peculiarities that relate to the respective political and higher education environment. While policy analysis in Switzerland displays both an applied practice-oriented focus as well as an international orientation in terms of basic research, Austria has developed its own constructivist perspectives. Germany as the largest of the three German-speaking countries combines both perspectives.

Keywords:   Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Comparative Perspective, Language, Politics

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