Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Lock and Key of MedicineMonoclonal Antibodies and the Transformation of Healthcare$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lara V Marks

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780300167733

Published to University Press Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.12987/yale/9780300167733.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 13 December 2017

Joy, Disappointment, Determination

Joy, Disappointment, Determination

Early Clinical Tests

Chapter:
(p.88) Chapter Five Joy, Disappointment, Determination
Source:
The Lock and Key of Medicine
Author(s):

Lara V. Marks

Publisher:
Yale University Press
DOI:10.12987/yale/9780300167733.003.0005

This chapter considers the development of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for cancer treatment. In the early 1980s, many scientists were optimistic that Mabs would defeat cancer. In 1982, John Minna of the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) predicted that Mabs would revolutionize cancer diagnosis within five years. The adoption of Mabs as probes for targeting and identifying the multitude of antigens on different cell types seemed to herald their use in detecting and classifying tumors on a hitherto unthinkable scale. Mabs also promised to deliver more precisely powerful tumor-cell-killing agents, such as chemotherapeutic drugs, radioactive isotopes, or toxins, and to provide a way of harnessing a patient's immune system to attack tumors. However, work in the cancer field proved less straightforward than anticipated, partly because much of the initial endeavor was undertaken by researchers in academic laboratories and clinics with limited resources. Funded by government and charitable sources, their work had only minimal support from industry. In addition, new cancer drugs faced stiff regulatory and ethical tests.

Keywords:   cancer treatment, Mabs, monoclonal antibodies, antigens, cancer research

University Press Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .