Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

You are looking at 1-4 of 4 items

  • Keywords: notoriety x
Clear All Modify Search

View:

Purified by Fire: A History of Cremation in America

Stephen Prothero

Published in print:
2001
Published Online:
May 2012
ISBN:
9780520208162
eISBN:
9780520929746
Item type:
book
Publisher:
University of California Press
DOI:
10.1525/california/9780520208162.001.0001
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

Just one hundred years ago, Americans almost universally condemned cremation. Today, nearly one-quarter of Americans choose to be cremated. The practice has gained wide acceptance as a funeral rite, ... More


Introduction

Edward Burns

in Reading Rochester

Published in print:
1995
Published Online:
June 2013
ISBN:
9780853230380
eISBN:
9781846317644
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:
10.5949/UPO9781846317644.001
Subject:
Literature, Poetry

This introduction describes Rochester as the most irrepressibly destructive of all the English poets. The very idea of the anarchic libertine poet, as created in the gossip of his contemporaries and ... More


Dig It: Looking for Fame in All the Wrong Places

Marjorie Garber

in Loaded Words

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
September 2012
ISBN:
9780823242047
eISBN:
9780823242085
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Fordham University Press
DOI:
10.5422/fordham/9780823242047.003.0012
Subject:
Literature, Criticism/Theory

Writers can become celebrities, but usually not for the quality of their writing. John Grisham and Danielle Steele are celebrities; John Ashbery and John Updike are, more properly, renowned or maybe ... More


Postscript: Oscar Wilde and Mae West

in Better Left Unsaid: Victorian Novels, Hays Code Films, and the Benefits of Censorship

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
June 2013
ISBN:
9780804784207
eISBN:
9780804784870
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9780804784207.003.0006
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This chapter examines the lives and works of Oscar Wilde and Mae West, two figures who benefited enormously from the constraints of moral censorship—until, abruptly, they did not. Oscar Wilde was an ... More


View: