Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation

You are looking at 1-7 of 7 items

  • Keywords: incumbency advantage x
Clear All Modify Search

View:

Election: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0005
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter explores the inherited incumbency advantage in elections, the mechanisms behind the advantage, and how it differs in the prereform and postreform electoral environments of Japan. New ... More


Elite Contestation and Mass Participation in Brazilian Legislative Elections, 1945–​2014

F. Daniel Hidalgo and Renato Lima

in New Order and Progress: Development and Democracy in Brazil

Published in print:
2016
Published Online:
June 2016
ISBN:
9780190462888
eISBN:
9780190492885
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190462888.003.0010
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics, Political Economy

This chapter examines the evolution of mass participation and elite contestation across 17 elections for Brazil's Chamber of Deputies. While participation has increased dramatically through this ... More


A Comparative Theory of Dynastic Candidate Selection

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0003
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter introduces a comparative theory of dynastic candidate selection based on a framework of supply and demand within the institutional contexts of electoral systems and candidate selection ... More


Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Daniel M. Smith

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.001.0001
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

Democracy is supposed to be the antithesis of hereditary rule by family dynasties. And yet “democratic dynasties” continue to persist in democracies around the world. They have been conspicuously ... More


Introduction: Dynasties in Democracies

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0001
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter introduces the puzzle of “democratic dynasties” and Japan’s unusually high level of dynastic politics compared to other democracies. The chapter briefly reviews the existing explanations ... More


Electoral Competition and the New Incumbency Advantage

Kathryn A. DePalo

in The Failure of Term Limits in Florida

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
May 2015
ISBN:
9780813060484
eISBN:
9780813050744
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:
10.5744/florida/9780813060484.003.0003
Subject:
History, American History: 20th Century

Chapter two assesses whether term limits have increased electoral competition. Forced turnover has facilitated more competition but only for open seat races. Legislators now effectively “own” their ... More


Disasters as Political Challenges

David K. Twigg

in The Politics of Disaster: Tracking the Impact of Hurricane Andrew

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780813041889
eISBN:
9780813043890
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:
10.5744/florida/9780813041889.003.0001
Subject:
History, American History: 20th Century

It is a well-documented phenomenon that incumbents are generally advantaged when running for reelection. Various anecdotes about the effects of disaster on elections and public officials indicate a ... More


View: