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 Information in the Age of Mind

Don M. Tucker

in Mind from Body: Experience from neural science

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
September 2007
ISBN:
9780195316988
eISBN:
9780199786848
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195316988.003.0009
Subject:
Psychology, Cognitive Psychology

This chapter utilizes the theory developed in this book as a springboard to look toward future developments. The basic theory involves biological structures that have evolved over thousands of ... More


The Quaking Body: Sensation, Electricity, and Religious Revival

Conevery Bolton Valencius

in The Lost History of the New Madrid Earthquakes

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
September 2014
ISBN:
9780226053899
eISBN:
9780226053929
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226053929.003.0005
Subject:
History, History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Many people across North America experienced the New Madrid earthquakes as a set of physical sensations. The earthquakes made them feel sick, drunk, nauseous, dizzy, and afraid. Their bodily ... More


Introduction

Mechthild Fend

in Fleshing Out Surfaces: Skin in French Art and Medicine, 1650-1850

Published in print:
2017
Published Online:
May 2017
ISBN:
9780719087967
eISBN:
9781526120724
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:
10.7228/manchester/9780719087967.003.0001
Subject:
Art, Art History

The chapter introduces questions of skin and flesh tones via a discussion of Pedro Almódovar's 2011 film The Skin I live in. The film suggests a number of themes that are pertinent to this book: skin ... More


Fleshing Out Surfaces: Skin in French Art and Medicine, 1650-1850

Mechthild Fend

Published in print:
2017
Published Online:
May 2017
ISBN:
9780719087967
eISBN:
9781526120724
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:
10.7228/manchester/9780719087967.001.0001
Subject:
Art, Art History

Throughout the history of European painting, skin has been the most significant surface for artistic imitation, and flesh has been a privileged site of lifelikeness. Skin and flesh entertain complex ... More


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