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Introduction: Dynasties in Democracies

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0001
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter introduces the puzzle of “democratic dynasties” and Japan’s unusually high level of dynastic politics compared to other democracies. The chapter briefly reviews the existing explanations ... More


Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Daniel M. Smith

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.001.0001
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

Democracy is supposed to be the antithesis of hereditary rule by family dynasties. And yet “democratic dynasties” continue to persist in democracies around the world. They have been conspicuously ... More


Putting Japan into Comparative Perspective

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0002
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter gives a descriptive overview of the empirical record using the book’s two original data sets. The first aim is to situate the case of Japan in a broader comparative context and highlight ... More


A Comparative Theory of Dynastic Candidate Selection

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0003
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter introduces a comparative theory of dynastic candidate selection based on a framework of supply and demand within the institutional contexts of electoral systems and candidate selection ... More


Selection: From Family Business to Party Priority

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0004
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter examines dynastic candidate selection in Japan under the single nontransferable vote (SNTV) electoral system and the changes that have occurred since the adoption of a mixed-member ... More


Election: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0005
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter explores the inherited incumbency advantage in elections, the mechanisms behind the advantage, and how it differs in the prereform and postreform electoral environments of Japan. New ... More


Promotion: Dynastic Dominance in the Cabinet

Daniel M. Smith

in Dynasties and Democracy: The Inherited Incumbency Advantage in Japan

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
January 2019
ISBN:
9781503605053
eISBN:
9781503606401
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9781503605053.003.0006
Subject:
Political Science, Comparative Politics

This chapter evaluates the advantage of dynastic ties in promotion to cabinet. Before 1970, legacy members of parliament—particularly those whose predecessors had served in cabinet—were ... More


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