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Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Stewart Davenport

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
book
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.001.0001
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

What did Protestants in America think about capitalism when capitalism was first something to be thought about? The Bible told antebellum Christians that they could not serve both God and mammon, but ... More


Motivations

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0004
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

This chapter discusses the need to understand two contexts that the clerical economists thought of as interrelated: the contentious and often chaotic world of ideas, and the equally contentious and ... More


Moral Problems, Scientific Solutions

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0005
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

“It has been often questioned whether Political Economy be a moral science,” John McVickar admitted in 1825, and then confessed: “The decision of Adam Smith and his followers is against it; the ... More


Utilitarian Conclusions: Moral Man, Moral Economy

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0006
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

Although the clerical economists were thoroughly “assured” that they favored Adam Smith's science detailing the pattern of economic progress and civilization, they used convoluted reasoning to arrive ... More


The Inconsistently Virtuous Economy

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0007
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

Although the clerical economists cared deeply about the problem of individual economic morality, they barely touched on the subject in their textbooks. In general, they subordinated ordinary people ... More


Some Comparisons and Preliminary Conclusions

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0012
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

Throughout its history, the Christian religion has been the starting point for remarkably diverse—even contradictory—political, social, and economic ideologies. Conservatives, for example, can often ... More


Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon

in Friends of the Unrighteous Mammon: Northern Christians and Market Capitalism, 1815-1860

Published in print:
2008
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226137063
eISBN:
9780226137087
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226137087.003.0017
Subject:
Religion, Religious Studies

The utilitarian clerical economists were all educators with a cosmic and national point of view, and an overriding desire for intellectual and social stability. The contrarians were self-styled ... More


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