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Tennyson, Browning, and the Poetry of Reflection

Gregory Tate

in The Poet's Mind: The Psychology of Victorian Poetry 1830–1870

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780199659418
eISBN:
9780191749018
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199659418.003.0002
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This chapter considers two issues that were of vital importance to poetry in the 1830s and throughout the mid-nineteenth century: the complex relation between the lyric expression and the ... More


Introduction: A Chain of Associations

Cairns Craig

in Associationism and the Literary Imagination: From the Phantasmal Chaos

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780748609123
eISBN:
9780748652044
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:
10.3366/edinburgh/9780748609123.003.0001
Subject:
Literature, Criticism/Theory

This chapter introduces associationism, which was the dominant psychological theory during the latter portion of the nineteenth century. It first studies how John Stuart Mill's bouts of depression ... More


Introduction

Gregory Tate

in The Poet's Mind: The Psychology of Victorian Poetry 1830–1870

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
January 2013
ISBN:
9780199659418
eISBN:
9780191749018
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199659418.003.0001
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

The introduction presents a theoretical and historical overview of the mutual influence of poetry and psychological theory in the Victorian period. It argues that the rising popularity of ... More


John Stuart Mill: “Pleasure” in the Laws of Psychology and the Principle of Morals

Dominique Kuenzle

in Pleasure: A History

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
June 2018
ISBN:
9780190225100
eISBN:
9780190225131
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780190225100.003.0011
Subject:
Philosophy, History of Philosophy, General

Philosophical thinking about pleasure today, especially in the context of normative ethics, is deeply influenced by the concept’s function within Bentham’s and Mill’s utilitarianism, according to ... More


Associationism and the Literary Imagination: From the Phantasmal Chaos

Cairns Craig

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780748609123
eISBN:
9780748652044
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:
10.3366/edinburgh/9780748609123.001.0001
Subject:
Literature, Criticism/Theory

This book traces the influence of empirical philosophy and associationist psychology on theories of literary creativity and on the experience of reading literature. It runs from David Hume's Treatise ... More


Going Steady: Canons’ Clockwork

Deidre Shauna Lynch

in Loving Literature: A Cultural History

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
May 2015
ISBN:
9780226183701
eISBN:
9780226183848
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226183848.003.0005
Subject:
Literature, 19th-century and Victorian Literature

This chapter tracks the efforts that critics, readers, anthologists, and publishers of almanacs made in the early-nineteenth century to incorporate aesthetic experiences into the continuum of ... More


<i>Basil</i> and <i>No Name</i>

Helena Ifill

in Creating character: Theories of nature and nurture in Victorian sensation fiction

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
September 2018
ISBN:
9781784995133
eISBN:
9781526136275
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
DOI:
10.7228/manchester/9781784995133.003.0002
Subject:
Literature, Criticism/Theory

Basil’s Robert Mannion, and No Name’s Magdalen Vanstone are both subject to monomaniacal impulses. In Basil, Collins draws on early-nineteenth-century theories of insanity and moral management, ... More


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