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The Poem’s Success: Ovid’s Ars amatoria and Remedia armoris

KATHARINA VOLK

in The Poetics of Latin Didactic: Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Manilius

Published in print:
2002
Published Online:
January 2010
ISBN:
9780199245505
eISBN:
9780191714986
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199245505.003.0006
Subject:
Classical Studies, Poetry and Poets: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter examines Ovid's poems of erotic instruction, Ars amatoria (‘Art of Love’, three books) and Remedia amoris (‘Remedies against Love’, one book), considering these works specifically as ... More


Lætus & exilii conditione fruor 1: Milton’s Ovidian ‘Exile’

Mandy Green

in Two Thousand Years of Solitude: Exile After Ovid

Published in print:
2011
Published Online:
January 2012
ISBN:
9780199603848
eISBN:
9780191731587
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603848.003.0005
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy

Milton’s early Latin elegies establish an enduring poetic association with Ovid. The first elegy of Milton’s Elegiarum liber primus—a verse letter to Charles Diodati, Milton’s best friend from ... More


Petrarch’s Second (and Third) Death

Jonathan Usher

in Petrarch in Britain: Interpreters, Imitators, and Translators over 700 years

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
January 2012
ISBN:
9780197264133
eISBN:
9780191734649
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
British Academy
DOI:
10.5871/bacad/9780197264133.003.0005
Subject:
Literature, 16th-century and Renaissance Literature

This chapter examines the concept of the solitary Petrarch and suggests that Petrarch's theory of secular fame and the various stages of death, fame, time, and eternity are already present in nuce in ... More


Briseis

Marco Fantuzzi

in Achilles in Love: Intertextual Studies

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
May 2013
ISBN:
9780199603626
eISBN:
9780191746321
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603626.003.0003
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

Achilles' almost consistent silence about his feelings for Briseis is investigated through the lens of the Hellenistic interpreters of Homer, who appear to downplay the few sentimental phrases ... More


Deidameia

Marco Fantuzzi

in Achilles in Love: Intertextual Studies

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
May 2013
ISBN:
9780199603626
eISBN:
9780191746321
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603626.003.0002
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

After investigating Homer's complete silence on Achilles' stay at Scyros and the hints he makes about the military character of Achilles' visit to the island in the “Iliad”, much time is devoted to ... More


Achilles in Love: Intertextual Studies

Marco Fantuzzi

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
May 2013
ISBN:
9780199603626
eISBN:
9780191746321
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199603626.001.0001
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

The Iliad is a poem whose events revolve around the “anger” of Achilles, and his personal fierceness and pursuit of glory remain, despite different and more complex nuances, the prevailing features ... More


Apollo in Tibullus 2.3 and 2.5

Jane Burkowski

in Augustan Poetry and the Irrational

Published in print:
2016
Published Online:
November 2015
ISBN:
9780198724728
eISBN:
9780191792250
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198724728.003.0008
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter examines the contradictory depictions of Apollo in Tibullus 2.3 and 2.5, as symbol of irrationality in the former, and of divine order in the latter. In 2.3, Apollo, as the pathetic ... More


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