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  • Keywords: Pompey x
  • Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval x
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Redressive Politeness: Requests, Refusals, and Advice

Jon Hall

in Politeness and Politics in Cicero's Letters

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
May 2009
ISBN:
9780195329063
eISBN:
9780199870233
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195329063.003.0004
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter examines three types of face-threatening act that regularly occur in the social interaction and correspondence of Roman aristocrats: making requests, issuing refusals, and offering ... More


The Passionate Statesman: Erõs and Politics in Plutarch's Lives

Jeffrey Beneker

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
September 2012
ISBN:
9780199695904
eISBN:
9780191741319
Item type:
book
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199695904.001.0001
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy

This book explores the intersection of passion and politics in Plutarch's Lives, with special emphasis on how Plutarch represents the influence of erōs (erotic desire) on the careers of his ... More


Erōs and the Statesman

Jeffrey Beneker

in The Passionate Statesman: Erõs and Politics in Plutarch's Lives

Published in print:
2012
Published Online:
September 2012
ISBN:
9780199695904
eISBN:
9780191741319
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199695904.003.0006
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Ancient Greek, Roman, and Early Christian Philosophy

This chapter first considers the philosophical background to Plutarch's representation of erōs, enkrateia (self-control), and sōphrosynē (temperance). It examines Xenophon's Memorabilia to uncover ... More


Reciprocity Exposed

in The Commerce of War: Exchange and Social Order in Latin Epic

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226111872
eISBN:
9780226111902
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226111902.003.0004
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter presents an overview of economic morality in Civil War, and also describes the three central characters: Caesar, Pompey, and Cato. Civil War lacks any transaction that even approaches ... More


Caesar, Pompey, and Cato

in The Commerce of War: Exchange and Social Order in Latin Epic

Published in print:
2009
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226111872
eISBN:
9780226111902
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226111902.003.0005
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter discusses the three central characters in Civil War: Caesar, Pompey, and Cato. Lucan strips Caesar of much of his real-life complexity. He has a tyrant's lust for power but without the ... More


(First‐)Beginnings and (Never‐)Endings in Lucan and Lucretius

K. M. Earnshaw

in Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
May 2013
ISBN:
9780199605408
eISBN:
9780191750595
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199605408.003.0011
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter argues that Lucan's epic of Rome's civil wars draws on Lucretian language, imagery, and even philosophy in the representation of the poem's troubled hero, Pompey. The Republican general ... More


A Turbulent People

T. P. Wiseman

in The Roman Audience: Classical Literature as Social History

Published in print:
2015
Published Online:
August 2016
ISBN:
9780198718352
eISBN:
9780191787645
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718352.003.0006
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter deals with the political experience of the Roman People in the sixties and fifties BC, in particular their enthusiasm for Pompey and their off–on relationship with Cicero, and its ... More


A Surprise from Cato (<i>Pompey</i> 54.5–9)

G. O. Hutchinson

in Plutarch's Rhythmic Prose

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
August 2018
ISBN:
9780198821717
eISBN:
9780191860928
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198821717.003.0011
Subject:
Classical Studies, Prose and Writers: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

In two Lives, Plutarch gives a detailed treatment of how Pompey became sole consul in 52 BC. The rhythmically dense account in the Life of Pompey can be compared in detail with the looser account in ... More


Cornelia Blames Herself (<i>Pompey</i> 74.5–75.2)

G. O. Hutchinson

in Plutarch's Rhythmic Prose

Published in print:
2018
Published Online:
August 2018
ISBN:
9780198821717
eISBN:
9780191860928
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/oso/9780198821717.003.0016
Subject:
Classical Studies, Prose and Writers: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

After another major battle, that of Pharsalus, the response of husband and wife is compared: the defeated Pompey and his wife Cornelia. The wife’s speech is more emotional and more densely rhythmic; ... More


Competition and its Costs: Φιλονικία‎ in Plutarch’s Society and Heroes

Philip A. Stadter

in Plutarch and his Roman Readers

Published in print:
2014
Published Online:
December 2014
ISBN:
9780198718338
eISBN:
9780191787638
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198718338.003.0020
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval

Philonikia, or the desire to win, was a prominent feature of Greek and Roman civic life, as it is of our own. This chapter first establishes that Plutarch does not use two words alongside each other, ... More


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