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Pleasure, Intelligence, and the Good

Terence Irwin

in Plato's Ethics

Published in print:
1995
Published Online:
November 2003
ISBN:
9780195086454
eISBN:
9780199833306
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0195086457.003.0019
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

This chapter focuses on how some crucial doctrines of the Republic are then developed in the Philebus. Firstly, the problem of whether pleasure or intelligence is the good in a more articulated way ... More


Reason and Virtue

Terence Irwin

in Plato's Ethics

Published in print:
1995
Published Online:
November 2003
ISBN:
9780195086454
eISBN:
9780199833306
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0195086457.003.0020
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

The last chapter analyses how Plato’s ethical views are developed in the later dialogues (the Philebus, the Statesman, and the Laws). In the last dialogue Plato tries to harmonise the different ... More


The Argument of The Gorgias

Terence Irwin

in Plato's Ethics

Published in print:
1995
Published Online:
November 2003
ISBN:
9780195086454
eISBN:
9780199833306
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0195086457.003.0007
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

The purpose of chapter 7 is to outline the role played by the Gorgias in the development of Plato’s ethical views. To start with, the characteristics and the peculiarities of rhetoric are evaluated. ... More


Implications of The Gorgias

Terence Irwin

in Plato's Ethics

Published in print:
1995
Published Online:
November 2003
ISBN:
9780195086454
eISBN:
9780199833306
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/0195086457.003.0008
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

Chapter 8 contains a detailed discussion of the consequences that may be inferred by the doctrines discussed in the Gorgias. The position of the Gorgias recalls that of the Protagoras. Then, it is ... More


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