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Anger and the Desire for Revenge

Voula Tsouna

in The Ethics of Philodemus

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
January 2008
ISBN:
9780199292172
eISBN:
9780191711770
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199292172.003.0010
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

This chapter examines Philodemus' diatribe On Anger, a principal piece of On the Passions and an important contribution to the philosophical literature on that subject. The first section supplies ... More


Feelings without Assent

in Stoicism & Emotion

Published in print:
2007
Published Online:
March 2013
ISBN:
9780226305578
eISBN:
9780226305202
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:
10.7208/chicago/9780226305202.003.0005
Subject:
Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy

This chapter investigates the feelings that sometimes occur in the absence of assent. The Stoic founders devised nonprejudicial terms like “bitings” and “troubling” for responses which do not have ... More


Moral Geographies of Anger

Owen Flanagan

in The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility

Published in print:
2016
Published Online:
November 2016
ISBN:
9780190212155
eISBN:
9780190212186
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190212155.003.0010
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy

This chapter offers a critical analysis of two arguments for eliminating anger from Seneca, the first-century Stoic, and Śāntideva, the eighth-century Buddhist philosopher. Seneca’s De Ira (“On ... More


For Love’s and Justice’s Sake: The Attachment, Injustice, and Catharsis Defenses

Owen Flanagan

in The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility

Published in print:
2016
Published Online:
November 2016
ISBN:
9780190212155
eISBN:
9780190212186
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190212155.003.0012
Subject:
Philosophy, Moral Philosophy

In this chapter we examine the next three arguments for not eliminating anger, even for treasuring it. “Attachment,” “Injustice,” and “Catharsis” say that anger is a necessary reaction to harm done ... More


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