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  • Keywords: twentieth century x
  • Plays and Playwrights: Classical, Early, and Medieval x
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Crossings of Experimental Music and Greek Tragedy

Christian Wolff

in Ancient Drama in Music for the Modern Stage

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
April 2015
ISBN:
9780199558551
eISBN:
9780191808432
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199558551.003.0015
Subject:
Classical Studies, Plays and Playwrights: Classical, Early, and Medieval

The intersections of twentieth-century music with ancient Greek tragedy are many and various, reflecting the exceptional stylistic and ideological heterogeneity of twentieth-century culture. This ... More


Sing Evohe! Three Twentieth-Century Operatic Versions of Euripides’ Bacchae

Robert Cowan

in Ancient Drama in Music for the Modern Stage

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
April 2015
ISBN:
9780199558551
eISBN:
9780191808432
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:osobl/9780199558551.003.0017
Subject:
Classical Studies, Plays and Playwrights: Classical, Early, and Medieval

This chapter explores the receptions of Hellenism in the twentieth century, particularly its religious, psychological, aesthetic, and political connotations. It focuses on three operatic adaptations ... More


Pasolini’s Medea: A Twentieth‐ Century Tragedy

Susan O. Shapiro

in Ancient Greek Women in Film

Published in print:
2013
Published Online:
January 2014
ISBN:
9780199678921
eISBN:
9780191760259
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199678921.003.0005
Subject:
Classical Studies, Literary Studies: Classical, Early, and Medieval, Plays and Playwrights: Classical, Early, and Medieval

Although recent scholarship on Pasolini's Medea has focused on its anti-colonialist message, this chapter takes a different approach, arguing that the portrayal of Medea's character is more nuanced ... More


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