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Freewheeling Uphill; Pedalling Downhill: Growing Pains in Developing a Land Market in China

Patrick McAuslan

in Law and Geography

Published in print:
2003
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780199260744
eISBN:
9780191698675
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199260744.003.0007
Subject:
Law, Philosophy of Law

Giving reference to some of China's national laws that cover such concerns as urban planning and development and land tenure and administration, to the information derived from conducting interviews ... More


Durkheim in China

Tim Murphy

in Law and Sociology

Published in print:
2006
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780199282548
eISBN:
9780191700200
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199282548.003.0007
Subject:
Law, Philosophy of Law

This chapter explores the consequences of practical Durkheimianism, and their implications for Western social theory and Western law. China is challenging to the Western eye due to the size of its ... More


‘Settling Accounts’: Law as History in the Trial of the Gang of Four

Alexander Cook

in Law and History: Current legal Issues 2003 Volume 6

Published in print:
2004
Published Online:
March 2012
ISBN:
9780199264148
eISBN:
9780191698910
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:
10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199264148.003.0019
Subject:
Law, Philosophy of Law

This chapter discusses the trial of the Gang of Four. In the winter of 1980–81, the chief engineers of China's Cultural Revolution, including the late Chairman Mao's wife, were tried and convicted ... More


Necessary Strangers: Law's Hospitality in the Age of Transnational Migrancy

Pheng Cheah

in Law and the Stranger

Published in print:
2010
Published Online:
June 2013
ISBN:
9780804771542
eISBN:
9780804775151
Item type:
chapter
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:
10.11126/stanford/9780804771542.003.0002
Subject:
Law, Philosophy of Law

This chapter examines how global capitalism and the circulation of workers across borders give rise to so-called “necessary strangers.” It offers a critique of Immanuel Kant's ideas on neighborliness ... More


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